Frequently Asked Questions

british cats

"Are they all grey?"
No, though the majority of the British Shorthairs bred are what we call blue. Half of all British shorthairs bred in Australia are blues.

“What is the difference between a British Blue and a Russian Blue?”
British have gold or copper eyes. Russians have green eyes. British have a denser harsher coat, the Russian coat is thick but soft and tends to not be as dense.  A British has a heavy semi-cobby body, fairly large and built for strength. A Russian is a lithe moderate kitten, a smaller leaner build that is great for speed and quickness.

“What other colours do British come in?”
Nearly all colours found in the kitten world. All tabby colours, all solids, bi-colours. In Australia and other countries it is possible to even find pointed and solid chocolate and lilac colours.

“Do they all have copper eyes?”
No.  Any silver coloured British have green to hazel. The shaded silver golden colours have green eyes. Solid whites can have blue eyes or odd eyes. The pointed have blue eyes. However, all other colours must have gold to copper eyes.

“How big do British shorthairs get?’
At maturity, a typical British male will be about 7 to 10 kg, and females somewhat smaller. This does vary – some families run smaller, some larger. It does take this breed a long time to mature. Both sexes will continue to fill out and thicken up until 4 years of age.

british cats

"Grooming your British Shorthair"
A light brush or comb can be given once a week, but hand grooming is the best.

“Do the females or the males make better pets?”
Each sex has its own set of characteristics. Males tend to be more happy go lucky, and less picky about whom they will receive attention from. Females are very  loyal to a smaller number of people and are a bit more serious.

“Do British shorthairs like to be hugged and carried like a  baby?”
No.  A British likes to be around you and by you. They will follow you, watch you and basically supervise all aspects of your life in their house. They simply  prefer their four paws on the ground. Being a larger heavy kitten, they feel very uncomfortable off the ground.

“Since British shorthairs are so big and sturdy are they safe  outside?”
No.  There is no domestic kitten big enough that can fight off a large truck or car or a disease like feline leukemia. Keeping your British shorthair inside will also limit its exposure to fleas and parasites. It is recommended that your cat stays inside.